How to change the Data Source of a SQL Server Reporting Services Report (Native Mode)?

Standard

Problem:

You have your SQL Server Reporting Services environment in native mode — and you want to modify the data source of a report there.

Solution:

  1. Navigate to Report Manager.
  2. Navigate to the Report that you want to Manage and run it
  3. After the report renders, you will have a breadcrumb navigation on the top right
  4. Click on the Last Part of the Breadcrumb NavigationSSRS properties report native mode
  5. It should open up the “properties” section of this report
  6. On the properties section, you should be able to manage the data source
    SSRS Manage Data Source Native Mode Shared
  7. Make the changes that you wanted to the data source settings of this SSRS report — and don’t forget to click “apply”
  8. Done!

Author: Paras Doshi

Back to Basics — What is DDL, DML, DCL & TCL?

Standard

I was talking with a database administrator about different categories that SQL Commands fall into — and I thought it would be great to document here. So here you go:

ACRONYM DESCRIPTION SQL COMMANDS
DML Data Manipulation Language: SQL Statements that affect records in a table. SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE
DDL Data Definition Language: SQL Statements that create/alter a table structure CREATE, ALTER, DROP
DCL Data Control Language: SQL Statements that control the level of access that users have on database objects GRANT, REVOKE
TCL Transaction Control Language: SQL Statements that help you maintain the integrity of data by allowing control over transactions COMMIT, ROLLBACK

BONUS (Advance) QUESTION:

Is Truncate SQL command a DDL or DML? Please use comment section!

Author: Paras Doshi

Productivity Tip: Learn to Comment/Uncomment SQL code using shortcuts

Standard

I spend a lot of time writing SQL code — and as a reader of this blog, You might be in the same boat. So any productivity gains that we could get here could go a long way. On that note, here’s a quick productivity tip: Learn to comment/uncomment multiple lines of SQL code using keyboard shortcut.

COMMENTS SQL CODE

If you are using SQL Server Management Studio, it’s “CTRL-K followed by CTRL+C” for commenting AND “CTRL+K followed by CTRL+U” for uncommenting.

If you are using some other Data Management Software tool, I am sure you can find it using their HELP section or googling around.

Either ways, these shortcuts go a long way in making you more productive! What is your favorite productivity tip?

SQL: How to get first/last transaction details for each user account?

Standard

Looking at user’s first/last transaction details is a common requirement. So given that you have a “user_transaction_details” table which looks something like:

Transaction_id | user_id | transaction_date | purchase amount

How would get first/last transaction details for each user account?

Here’s a design pattern:

[code language=”SQL”]

select AllTransactions.user_id,AllTransactions.purchase_amt from user_transaction_details AllTransactions
inner join
(
select user_id, min(transaction_timestamp) as first_transaction_timestamp from user_transaction_details
group by user_id
) FirstTransaction
on AllTransactions.user_id = FirstTransaction.user_id and AllTransactions.transaction_timestamp = FirstTransaction.first_transaction_timestamp

[/code]

To get the last transaction details for each user account, replace min function with max and that should be it.

Note: Depending on your data model and how you used it in the join, it might be that there would be multiple rows marked as “first/last” transaction and so would want to spend some time figuring out how to deal with these multiple row situation especially if you’re planning to further join this data.

Conclusion:
In this post, I shared a design pattern to write a SQL query to get first/last transaction details for each user account type.

Question for you:
How would you solve this problem? Share you query in the comments section!

Business Metric #4 of N: “Leads” (marketing)

Standard

Summary:

In this post, we will discuss about a common metric used by Sales & Marketing teams called “leads”.

Description:

In simple terms,

Leads = number of individuals (or companies) that have expressed an interest in your goods or services.

why do we want to measure this?

For a business to grow, it’s important that the sales & marketing department work to make sure that there is a growing interest in company’s goods or services. It’s important to track this metric to make sure that it’s a positive upward trend!

Word of caution: It’s important to also note that this metric on its own can be misleading. It might be a good idea to also track “conversion ratios” (converting leads or potential customers into actual customers) to make sure that high-quality leads are being generated.

where can you get this data?

Depending on the channel that you use to capture potential customer’s information & the technology maturity of the company, it varies. I’ve seen CRM systems used to report “leads” data and I’ve also seen manual excel files that are used to generate leads report.

Are there any sub-categories?

Yes, it’s usually subdivided into 1) Marketing Qualified Leads and 2) Sales Marketing Leads.

usually, Marketing Qualified lead (MQL) is someone who has shown interest in your product or service but you don’t know if they fulfill your qualifications to buy your products or services. out of all MQL’s, those leads that qualify your criteria and are identified are someone who is ready to buy your products or services becomes your Sales Qualified Lead (SQL) and sales department get’s ready to engage with these leads to make them an actual customer.

Marketing Funnel Sales Qualified Lead

Conclusion:

In this post, we saw a high level overview of a business metric used in marketing and sales called “leads”.¬† As mentioned earlier, don’t report on just “leads” – it can be misleading for marketing & sales executives since upward trend in number of leads doesn’t necessarily result in increased sales unless the quality of new leads is same or better. Marketing and sales executives would really appreciate any context¬† (example: conversions) that you can provide to their “leads” report. I hope that helps!

How to create an Average Aggregation in SQL Server Analysis services?

Standard

Problem:

How do create a measure that does an average over a field from fact table? You can’t find it the “usage” property while trying to create a new measure:

SQL Server Analysis Services Average Aggregation

Solution:

Before i show you the solution, I want you to know that this is a Level 100 solution to get you started – so depending on the complexity of your cube the calculated measure that you are about to create may or may not perform well – if it does not perform well, you might have to dig a little deeper and here’s one blog post to get you started: URL

OK, back to topic! Here are the steps.

SCENARIO: you need average of Sales Amount.

1. Create a SUM OF SALES AMOUNT measure

Steps: Open cube > Cube Structure > Right click on Measure Group > New Measure > Usage: “SUM” > Source Table: Pick your Fact Table. In this case let’s say it’s Fact Sales > Source Column: In this case, lets say it’s SALES AMOUNT

2. Create a COUNT OF SALES measure (important: row count vs. non empty count – this is not a developer’s choice, a business user needs to define that)

Steps: Open cube > Cube Structure > Right click on Measure Group > New Measure > Usage: count of rows OR count of non empty values (again this is not developer’s choice, a business user needs to define this) > Source Table: Pick your Fact Table. In this case let’s say it’s Fact Sales > Source Column: In this case, lets say it’s SALES AMOUNT

3. Create a Calculated Measure that equals (SUM OF SALES/COUNT OF SALES)

3a. Switch to Calculations section > create a new calculated member:

SSAS Analysis services new calculated measure

3b. Complete Name, Format String & Associated Measure Group. For the Expression, use the following expression. Please use this as a starting point for your measure:

[code language=”SQL”]
IIF([measures].[COUNT OF SALES]=0,0,[measures].[SUM OF SALES AMOUNT]/[measures].[COUNT OF SALES])
[/code]

4. Before you test it, if you don’t need the SUM OF SALES AMOUNT and COUNT OF SALES measures than don’t forget to hide them!

Conclusion:

In this post, you saw how to define a measure with average aggregation is SSAS.

SQL Server Query Fundamentals: A Simple example of a Query that uses PIVOT:

Standard

Problem:

Convert the following source data into a schema shown below:

SQL SERVER TSQL PIVOTSolution:

Here’s the code that uses PIVOT function to get to the solution, please use this as a starting point.

Note the use of aggregation function avg – this will depend on the requirement. In the example, the Test_value need to be average if more than one tests were performed.

[code language=”SQL”]

— source data
SELECT [Product_ID],[Test_Desc],[Test_Val] FROM [dbo].[Address]
go

— Destination data using PIVOT function
select * from [dbo].[Address]
pivot( avg(test_val) for test_Desc IN (Test1,Test2,Test3,Test4,Test5))
as Tests

[/code]