Business Intelligence system – Customer Complaints – B2B company:

Customer complaint dashboard quality feedback
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Analyzing customer complaints in crucial for customer service & sales teams. It helps them increase customer loyalty and fix quality issues. To that end, here’s a mockup:

Note: Drill down reports are not shown, details are hidden to maintain confidentiality and numbers are made up.

Customer complaint dashboard quality feedback

Time Intelligence in MDX: last N days

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it’s a common requirement to create a report that shows last N days of a business metric – so I thought I’ll post a template here for SQL server analysis server’s MDX query:

[code language=”SQL”]

WITH
MEMBER [Measures].[Sales_last_15_days] AS
Sum
(
{
[Calendar].[Date YYYYMMDD].CurrentMember.Lag(14)
:
[Calendar].[Date YYYYMMDD].CurrentMember
}
,[Measures].[Sales]
)

MEMBER [Measures].[CurrDate] as
"[Calendar].[Date YYYYMMDD].[" + Cstr(Year(Now())*10000+month(now())*100+day(now())) +"]"

SELECT
{
[Measures].[Sales_last_15_days]
} ON COLUMNS
FROM
[CubeName]
WHERE
STRTOMEMBER([Measures].[CurrDate])

[/code]

Here are things that you’ll need to adjust to make it work for your scenario:

1. Date Dimension Attribute & it’s format. The example shows yyyymmdd but you could have different format of the date.

2. Measure name. Instead of [Measures].[Sales] you’ll have to replace it with your business metric. Also, make sure you are using the right aggregate function, in the example above I have used SUM but you’ll have to change this based on your requirement.

3. Create a parameter and use it in index for the Lag function.

4. change [cubename] to your cube name.

I hope this gives you a good starting point to create last N days for your business metric.

SQL Server Reporting Services Tip: How to capitalize just the first letter of text?

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Attention to detail is a key in creating SSRS reports/dashboards that look like a work of a professional; To that end, here’s a tip: How to capitalize the first letter in your string? In other words, how to Camel Case the Text?

Here’s the function that you can use in your SSRS Expressions:

[code language=”SQL”]

StrConv("hello world",3)

[/code]

OR

[code language=”SQL”]
StrConv("hello world",vbProperCase)
[/code]

Input Function Output
hello world StrConv(“hello world”,3) Hello World

I hope that helps!

SSAS Joining Facts at different granularity to a single dimension:

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Problem:

You have a Fact Sales and Fact Target in your data mart. Fact Sales stores values are product sub category level and fact target stores values at product category level because business sets “sales targets” at a higher (rolled up) level. How do you connect it to a single dimension at different granularity?

Solution:

Here’s the table structure, I just made this up for the demo purpose:

Fact Sales Table

1. Fact Sales

Fact Target

2. Fact Target

Product Sub Category Table

3. Dim product sub category

so, you went ahead and tried testing by creating relationship’s to single dimension at different granularity in the cube:

SSAS Dimension Usage RelationshipsNote how the relationship was specified between Fact Target and Product Sub Category Dimension – it’s joined at a different granularity compared to fact sales. it would be help you from a performance standpoint if the fields that you are using to join the fact and dimension is an int.

SSAS Relationship Dimension Usage Regular

So, you browse the cube and here’s what you get:

Excel SSAS Analysis Services

Note the problem: the target values are being repeated for sub categories but that shouldn’t be happening, right? that’s misleading to business users…ok, to recap what we need to do here: hide target values for subcategories since targets are not set at that granularity. but we do need to show them if the business users pulls in product category.

So here’s a measure group property that comes to the rescue!

Go to Fact Target Measure group’s property > Set IgnoreUnRelatedDimension to False

SSAS Ignore Unrelated Dimension Property

deploy and browse your cube again, here’s what you will see now:

Excel SSAS Analysis Services Pivot Table

That’s it! you have successfully joined facts at different granularity to a single dimension.

SSIS: Using Data Profiling Task to check the candidate key profile of unknown data source(s)

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As a part of Business Intelligence projects, we spend a significant amount in extracting, transforming and loading data from source systems. So it’s always helpful to know as much as you can about the data sources like NULLS, keys, statistics among other things. One of the things that I like to do if the data is unknown is to make sure that I get the candidate keys correct to make sure the key used can uniquely identify the rows in the data. It’s really helpful if you do this upfront because it would avoid a lot of duplicate value errors in your projects.

So here’s a quick tutorial on how you can check the candidate key profile using data profiling task in SSIS, You need to perform two main tasks:
1. Generate the xml file using the Data profiling task in SSIS
2. View the content of the xml file using the Data Profile Viewer Tool or using the Open Profile Viewer option in the Data Profiling task editor in SSIS.

Here are the steps:
1a. Open SQL Server Data Tools (Visual Studio/BIDS) and the SSIS project type
1b. Bring in Data Profiling Task on Control Flow
1c. Open the Data Profiler Task editor and configure the destination folder that the tasks uses to create the XML file. You can either create a new connection or use an existing one. If you use an existing connection, make sure that you are setting the OverwriteDestination property to True if you want the file to be overwritten at the destination.

1 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

1d. Click on Quick Profile to configure the data source for the data profiler task

2 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

1e. In the quick profile form, you’ll need to select the connection, table/view and also specify what you to need to computer. For candidate key profile, make sure that the candidate key profile box is checked.

3 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

1f. Run the Task and a XML file should be placed at the destination you specified in step 1C.

Now, It’s time to view what profiler captured.

2a. you can open “Data Profile Viewer” by searching for its name in the start button.

4 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

2b. once it opens up, click on open and browse to the xml file generated by the data profiling task.

5 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

2c. once the file opens up, you can the candidate key profiles.

6 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

2d. Alternatively, You can also open the data profile viewer from the “Data Profiling Task” in SSIS. Go to the Editor > Open Profile Viewer:

7 SSIS Data Profiling Task Data Cleaning Candidate Key

Conclusion:
In this post, you saw how to profile data using the Data Profiling Task in SSIS.

#sqlpass #msbi online event: “The Accidental Report Designer: Data Visualization Best Practices in #SSRS”

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PASS Business Analytics VC presents “The Accidental Report Designer: Data Visualization Best Practices in SSRS” by Meagan Longoria. Here are the meeting details:

Date & Time: Thu, June 19 2014 12:00 Eastern Daylight Time

RSVP URL:

http://bit.ly/PASSBAVC061914

Session Abstract:
Whether you are a DBA, a developer, or an analyst, there is a good chance that you will have to create reports for coworkers, company executives, or clients. As with any UI design, careful consideration should be given to your data visualization design to ensure you are effectively communicating the intended message and providing a good user experience. While the principles are applicable across reporting platforms and tools, this session will contain demos and examples implemented in Reporting Services using SQL Server Data Tools. Learn how to make information (not just data) the focus of your report and provide your audience with something better than just shiny!

Session Level:
Intermediate

Speaker BIO:
Meagan Longoria is a BI consultant with Valorem Consulting in Kansas City, Missouri. She has over 6 years of experience with the SQL Server BI stack and enjoys sharing her knowledge and experiences at SQL Saturdays. She is also one of the coordinators for SQL Saturday in Kansas City.
Contact URL: http://datasavvy.wordpress.com

See you there!

Paras Doshi
Chapter Co-Leader, PASS BA VC

SQL Server reporting services: How to Add Trademark special symbol in Text?

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Problem Statement:

The goal of this blog post is to share a quick tip on SQL Server Reporting Services (SSRS): How to add Trademark TM special symbol in Text?

Solution:

In SSRS, you can put following code in the Expressions:

[code language=”SQL”]

="Text"& ChrW(8482) &" Dashboard"

[/code]

Output:
SQL Server Reporting Services SSRS Trademark special symbol