Windows 7: How do you stop programs from automatically running when Windows Starts?

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In this blog-post, we would see how you can stop programs from automatically running when windows start. We’ll see how you do that using MSConfig. Before we begin, let’s discuss why would you want to stop few programs from automatically running when windows starts? Well, programs consume memory and thus lowers overall system performance. So by switching unwanted (or infrequently used) programs – you are increasing system performance. So ready? here are the steps:

1) Start > type “msconfig.exe” > open msconfig.exe

2) In MSConfig.exe > switch to “startup” tab

3) Disable the programs by unchecking the check-box.

Note: Before Disabling, please verify what a program is. You do not want to disable programs like Microsoft Security Essentials or third part firewall. That would be bad!

4) So I unchecked check boxes for Google Toolbar, Skype and Spotify on my netbook – and so these programs would not run automatically when my net-book starts.

disable startup programs msconfig windows 7

5) When you’re done – Click OK > And You can choose to restart your computer – changes would be applied only after the restart.

That’s about it.

Note that here are other methods too like one’s listed here, research and use the method that suits you – But do NOT forget to switch off the unwanted programs from running automatically when windows starts.

Hadoop on Azure’s Javascript Interactive Console has basic graphing functions:

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The Hadoop on Azure’s Javascript console has basic graphing functions: Bar, Line & Chart. I think this is great becuase it gives an opportunity to visualize data that’s in HDFS directly from the Interactive Javascript Console! Here’s a screenshot:

hadoop on azure bar and line graph javascript

In the console, I ran the help(“graph”) command to see how I can use this function:
Draw a graph of data
graph.bar(data, options) Bar graph
graph.line(data, options) Line graph
graph.pie(data, options) Pie chart

Parameters
data (array) Array of data objects
options (object) Options object, with
x (string) Property to use for x-axis values
y (string) Property to use for y-axis values
title (string) Graph title
orientation (number) x-axis label orientation in degrees
tickInterval (number) x-axis tick interval

Conclusion:

In this blog-post, I posted that Hadoop on Azure’s Javascript Interactive Console has basic graphing functions.

Related articles:

Visualizing MapReduce Algorithm with WordCount Example:

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In this blog-post, we would visualize how MapReduce Algorithms operates to perform a Word Count on a Text Input:

First of all, for all programmers out there, Here is the code (Javascript):

[sourcecode language=”javascript”]
var map = function (key, value, context) {
var words = value.split(/[^a-zA-Z]/);
for (var i = 0; i < words.length; i++) {
if (words[i] !== "") {
context.write(words[i].toLowerCase(), 1);
}
}
};
var reduce = function (key, values, context) {
var sum = 0;
while (values.hasNext()) {
sum += parseInt(values.next());
}
context.write(key, sum);
};
[/sourcecode]

Courtesy: Microsoft Hadoop on Azure Samples

Now, let’s visualize this using an example.

Suppose the Text is “Hadoop on Azure sample Hadoop is on Windows Azure Hadoop is on Windows server” – Then this is how you can think of what happens to your input when it is processed first by Map function and then by Reduce function:

INPUT MAP REDUCE

Hadoop on Azure sample

Hadoop is on Windows Azure

Hadoop is on Windows server

Hadoop 1 Hadoop 3
On 1
Azure 1 on 3
Sample 1
Hadoop 1 Azure 2
Is 1
On 1 Sample 1
Windows 1
Azure 1 Is 2
Hadoop 1
Is 1 Windows 2
On 1
Windows 1 Server 1
Server 1

Conclusion:

In this blog post, we visualized how MapReduce Algorithm operates for a WordCount Example.

End to End Demo: Hadoop (HDInsight) + Hive + Excel + Power View + Azure Data Market

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A great end to end demo shown by Microsoft at Strata conference 2012:

Description about Demo:

Scenario: Analyze web logs of an online bike store.

Tools demonstrated:

Hadoop (Get started with HDInsight)

Hive.

Excel 2013

Power View

Azure Data Market.

A Dashboard in Power View showing co-relation between discount campaigns and the traffic:

This is mash-up of data from Hadoop (traffic) and data from SQL Server (discount campaigns)

end to end demo microsoft hadoop hdinsight

Conclusion

In this blog-post, I shared an awesome demo about HDInsight. check it out!

Getting started with HDInsight (a.k.a Microsoft’s Big Data hadoop Platform) on local Windows Machine!

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Recently Microsoft announced HDInsight on Windows server! and so it’s good to get a chance to play with its public preview! Currently there two ways you can run HDInsight: 1) Via Windows Azure 2) On your local Windows machine.

In this blog-post, I would show you step by step to install a HDInsight on a local Windows Machine. For the purpose of this blog-post, I am going to show it on Windows 7 but it also supported on Windows Server 2008 R2.

download hadoop on windows machine hdinsight

Note that the ideal audience for this blog-post would be a developer who wants to kick tires of Hadoop on windows machine to see what it can do! If I had wanted to target it to Hadoop administrators then I would have shown how to do it on Windows Server and also how to manage the Hadoop cluster with system center. But for this blog-post, I am going to target developers so that they can get started playing with Hadoop on a windows machine! With that, here are the steps to install Hadoop (HDInight) on Windows 7:

1) open Web Platform Installer. Download and install it if you haven’t yet.

2) search for Hadoop

install hadoop windows via web platform installer

3) Install it!

4) You should get a message saying that it successfully installed it!

5) Do you see a Microsoft HDInsight Dashboard ICON on your Desktop? Yes? Great! Open it!

windows hadoop big data dashboard6) And here’s the IIS manager showing the site that hosts the above Dashboard. Just wanted to show this to folks who might not see the Dashboard at http://localhost:8085/

IIS windows hadoop local host site port 8085

7) That’s about it for his post. If you want to continue learning, check out the “documentation” link at the bottom on the Hadoop Dashboard which is: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/6204.hadoop-based-services-for-windows-en-us.aspx

Conclusion:

In this blog-post, we saw how to install HDInsight (Microsoft’s Hadoop) on local windows machine.

Related Articles:

Who on earth is creating “Big data”?

Want to learn about BigData? read Oreilly’s Book “Planning for BigData”

How to Install Microsoft HDInsight Server Hadoop on Windows 8 Professional

Five quick reasons why I use virtual machines on my personal computer:

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I was talking to a friend yesterday about virtual machines.  The topic got started because I had about  4 virtual machines and I had to explain why I had such a setup – why just not “dual-boot” – and so I thought I document the reasons that I gave out. Note that I am using Virtual Machines on my personal computer and this blog post falls into the class of “personal technology” and I’ll not touch upon why businesses use virtual machines. Before we begin, a quick note about what are virtual machines? Think of virtual machines as “software application” that can run “operating systems” in them. Example: You have Windows X on your machine and there’s an application on your machine that says “LinuxOS.xyz” – if you click on it, it would open Linux operating system as an application without leaving your windows machine. This is not technically correct definition but from a personal technology standpoint, all you need to know is that “virtual machines” lets you run operating systems like linux, windows, etc like an application on your main operating system. Here’s my current configuration: “I have windows 7 as my main operating system. and I have a couple of virtual machines running Windows Server 2008 R2, one virtual machine having a windows 7 environment & one machine to kick tires of Hadoop”. with that, here are the reasons that I use virtual machines:

1) I can have multiple flavors of operating systems running as application on top of my “main operating systems”. And I do not have to worry about the hassles of dual/multiple boot.

2) I can COPY a virtual machine and PASTE it on a different machine. Basically share “OS along w/ app installed” with others or open them up using a different computer

3) I can “Save” a state of a virtual machine. For example I can save the state of my virtual machine today and if something happens tomorrow then I can just “restore” it to the previously saved state. Think of it like “system restore”

4) When I am on a virtual machine, it gives me the freedom to play around with “do not touch” and “not recommended” configuration. I can experiment things I want to without worrying about “breaking” my main operation system

5) Do you have software’s on your OS that you installed for one-off purpose and forgot to uninstall it later? I usually install applications that I rarely use on a separate virtual machine. This helps me keep my main operating system cleaner.

Those were the quick five reasons I use virtual machines on my computer, if you want to get started you can check out: Microsoft virtual PC or Oracle’s Virtual Box.

Question: Do you use virtual machines on your personal computer? Yes? What is your “why”?  why not share that in the comments section?

SQL Azure: Is there a “per transaction” cost for Windows Azue SQL Database?

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Question: Is there a “per transaction” cost for Windows Azue SQL Database (SQL Azure)?

Short Answer: No

I recently answered the question on MSDN forum where the question was about Transactions and the associated cost in SQL Azure. As of now, There is no “per transaction” cost associated with SQL Azure. There are two parameters that affect your SQL Azure Bill: 1) Database Size 2) Outbound Data Transfer and an example of an outbound transfer would be data access by an application hosted outside of your Azure DB’s data-center.

If you want to read more about SQL Azure pricing, here’s the official resource:

https://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/pricing/details/#header-4

And here are some of the blog-posts that I’ve written on the same topic:

SQL Azure got a new pricing model!

SQL Azure: Indexes are very helpful but they cost $Money$

Getting started with SQL Azure – Part 3: Provisioning and Billing Model of SQL Azure << Paras Doshi