As a data scientist, are you dissatisfied with your career? Why?

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As a data scientist, I am not dissatisfied. I love what I do!

But I might have gotten lucky since I got into this for the right reasons. I was looking for a role that had a little bit of both tech & business and so few years back, Business Intelligence and Data Analysis seemed like a great place to start. So I did that for a while. Then industry evolved and the analytics maturity of the companies that I worked also evolved and so worked on building predictive models and became what they now call “Data scientist”.

It doesn’t mean that data science is the right role for everyone.

One of my friends feels that it’s not that “technical” and doesn’t like this role. He is more than happy with data engineer role where he gets to build stuff and dive deeper into technologies.

One of my other friends doesn’t like that you don’t own business/product outcomes and prefers a product manager role (even though he has worked as a data analyst for a while now and is working on transitioning away).

So, just based on the empirical data that I have, data science might not be an ideal path for everyone.

Hope that helps!

VIEW QUESTION ON QUORA

As a student preparing for data anaylst & science roles, should I generalize vs specialize?

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This question was posted on Springboard forum.

Here’s my answer:

It depends on your target industry & where they are in their life-cycle.

It has four stages: Startup, Growth, Maturity, Decline.

Industry lifecycle

Generalization is great in earlier stages. If you are targeting jobs at startups; generalize. You should know enough about lot of things.

T-shaped professionals are great for Growth stage. They specialize in something but still know enough about lot of things. E.g. Sr Growth/Marketing Analyst. Know enough about analytics & data science to be dangerous but specializes in marketing.

Specialization is great for mature industries. They know a lot about few things. E.g. Statisticians in an Insurance industry. They have made careers out of building risk models.

What analytics data gives you the most actionable advice to improve your blog?

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Someone asked on Quora: What analytics data gives you the most actionable advice to improve your blog? so here’s my answer:

I have been blogging about Analytics for past few years and this question is at the intersection of both so let me give it a shot:

It depends on two things: 1) Your goal for running the blog 2) Age of the blog

#1: Your goal

why blog analytics

First let’s talk about your goal for running the blog. It’s important to define this as this would help set the metrics that you will monitor and take actions to improve it.

Let’s say that the goal of your blog is to earn is to monetize using ads. So your key performance indicator (KPI) will be monthly ad revenue. In that case you can improve by one of the three things: Number of People visiting the blog x % of visitors clicking on ads x average revenue per ad click. You can work on marketing your blog to increase number of people visiting the blog. Then you can work on ad placement on your blog to increase % of visitors clicking the ad and then you can work on trying different ad networks to see which one pays you the most per click.

let’s take one more example. Like me if your goal is to use your blog for “exposure” which helps me build credibility in the field that I work in. In this case, the KPI i look at is Monthly New Visitors. I drill down further to see which marketing channels are driving that change. That helps me identify channels that I can double down on and reduce investments in other areas. For example: I found that Social is not performing that great but Search has been working great — I started investing time in following SEO principles and spent less time on posting on social.

So first step: Define your goal and your KPI needs to align with that.

#2: Age of your blog:

  • Early: Now at this stage, you will need to explore whether you can achieve what you set out to using blogging. So let’s say you wanted to earn money online. In first few weeks/months, you need to figure out if it’s possible. Can you get enough traffic to earn what you wanted? yes? Great! If not, blogging might not be the answer and eventually all your energy is being wasted. Figure this out sooner rather than later — and take first few weeks/months to make sure blogging helps you achieve your goal.
  • Mid: By this stage, you should know how blogging is helping you achieve your goal. So it’s time to pick one metric that matters! So if your goal was to earn money using ads then go for Monthly ad revenue and set up systems to track this. Google Analytics will be a great starting point. Also, at this stage, you should be asking for qualitative feedback. Ask your friends, ask on social, get comments, do guest blogging on popular platforms and see if you get engagement — basically focus on qualitative feedback since you won’t have enough visitors that you can analyze quantitative data.
  • Late: In this stage, you have the data and the blog is starting to get momentum. Don’t stop qualitative feedback loops but now start looking at quantitative data too. Figure out the underlying driving forces that move the needle on your KPI. Focus on improving those!

TL;DR: Define your “why” and then pick a metric— then use combination of qualitative and quantitative data to improve the underlying driving factors to improve the metric.

VIEW ON QUORA

Completed Marketing Analytics Course from Coursera:

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I just successfully completed the Marketing Analytics course from coursera. The certificate was issued by coursera and university of virginia — it was great to brush up some of my existing skills and then build upon it by learning some new techniques/frameworks.

The course covered:

  1. Marketing Resource Allocation
  2. Metrics for Measuring Brand Assets
  3. Customer Lifetime Value
  4. Regression Basics
  5. Marketing Experiments

If you haven’t checked out courses on coursera yet then I would recommend to check those out! There’s a ton out there for data professionals!

Coursera Marketing Analytics Certificate

 

500 posts! New Blog Domain name = InsightExtractor.com!

500 blog posts paras doshi
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A new milestone for this blog — 500+ posts! To commemorate this, I decided to change the domain name from ParasDoshi.com to InsightExtractor.com — my goal was two-fold:1) provide an easy to remember name 2) representative of the work that we all do: we help extract insights from data.

Remember to subscribe to this Blog via Email or RSS.

RSS:

http://insightextractor.com/feed/

Email:

Best,
Paras Doshi

Back to Basics — What is DDL, DML, DCL & TCL?

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I was talking with a database administrator about different categories that SQL Commands fall into — and I thought it would be great to document here. So here you go:

ACRONYM DESCRIPTION SQL COMMANDS
DML Data Manipulation Language: SQL Statements that affect records in a table. SELECT, INSERT, UPDATE, DELETE
DDL Data Definition Language: SQL Statements that create/alter a table structure CREATE, ALTER, DROP
DCL Data Control Language: SQL Statements that control the level of access that users have on database objects GRANT, REVOKE
TCL Transaction Control Language: SQL Statements that help you maintain the integrity of data by allowing control over transactions COMMIT, ROLLBACK

BONUS (Advance) QUESTION:

Is Truncate SQL command a DDL or DML? Please use comment section!

Author: Paras Doshi

Data puking and how T-mobile alienated a potential customer:

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I saw this ad on a highway earlier today and my reaction: why would I switch to a network that has just “96%” coverage.

T mobile ad — example of data puking

…instead of converting a potential buyer, this ad actually made me more nervous. You know why? Its a case of what I like to call “data puking” where you throw bunch of numbers/stats/data at someone hoping that they will take action based off of it. So what would have helped in this ad? It would have been great to see it compared against someone else. Something like: we have the largest coverage compared to xyz. My ATT connection is spotty in downtown areas so if it said something like we have 96% coverage compared to ATT’s 80% then I would have been much more likely to make the switch.

I wrote about this adding benchmark in your analysis here

Takeaway from this blog: don’t throw data points at your customers. Give them the context and guide them through the actions that you want them to take.